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Instruments & More

Instruments & More

It is essential to play a violin that is sized correctly. Playing a violin that is too small or too big contributes to a range of issues that can compromise technique, sound, physical posture, and musical well-being. Here’s what to look for — and if you’re a parent of a younger violinist to know how to upsize the instrument as they grow up.

 

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Unlike violins, which can sound beautifully for centuries when well-cared for, violin strings need to be replaced regularly. If you don’t change them as needed, the strings will sound duller, less resonant, and may even fray or snap causing potential physical injuries.

 

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Why should you disinfect your brass instruments?

In general, to avoid spreading diseases and to keep ourselves and students from getting reinfected. It’s smart to take extra measures to ensure we’re keeping ourselves as safe as we can. With that in mind, as musicians and educators, keeping our musical instruments clean and disinfected needs to become second nature.

 

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With the flu season upon us, and in particular, the spread of COVID-19, we thought it a good idea to pass along recommendations from various experts about how to protect yourself and your string instrument to minimize inadvertently spreading viruses and other germs.

 

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Wood continuously interacts with the moisture in the air around it. If the air is too dry, it will suck moisture out of your violin. A violin that's not surrounded by air in the target range of 45 to 55% humidity can mar your instrument. If your violin is too dry, it may experience temporary changes, like poor sound. A worse case scenario occurs when constant changes in the relative humidity damage your instrument badly enough to need repair. Not good.

 

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S tring musicians take great care with their posture and playing technique to prevent stress- or overuse injuries. Those who play the upright bass must take extra precautions before ever removing the instrument from the case due to its large, heavy, and cumbersome anatomy.

 

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A violin case is a must – so let go of any idea that cases are optional. The fragility of string instruments, particularly violins and violas, requires an extra layer of protection whenever the instrument isn’t in use.

 

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The string instrument family has the most significant number of "children" than any other group of instruments. Worldwide, there are more than 300 different instruments that are considered part of the string family. These range from the single-stringed diddly bow, which originated here in the United States and contributed to blues music, to the 88-stringed piano, which is considered both a string and a percussion instrument.

 

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W hile holiday classics are "classic" for a reason, it can be mind numbing to play the same songs over and over, year after year. We understand your frustration.

Thus, one of our holiday gifts to you is this list of 10 modern holiday songs made just for string musicians. Yes, they're arrangements based on traditional carols, but at least they'll give you a break from the typical versions you've played for years.

 

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Winter is one of the toughest seasons on your instrument. Moisture – and mostly a lack of it – can present moderate to large problems. Temperature and humidity fluctuations bounce between outdoor extremes, indoor climate control, and the "in-between" places like your car or on the bus. These extremes and constant changes can cause issues that damage the bridges, tuning pegs and strings. They also affect the wood body of the instrument, causing it to warp or crack.

 

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News & Events

How to tell if your violin is too small or too big

How to tell if your violin is too small or too big

It is essential to play a violin that is sized correctly. Playing a violin that is too small or too big contributes to a range of issues that can compromise technique, sound, physical posture, and musical well-being. Here’s what to look for — and if you’re a parent of a younger violinist to know how to upsize the instrument as they grow up.

 

Read More

When Are Your Violin Strings Worn Out?

When Are Your Violin Strings Worn Out?

Unlike violins, which can sound beautifully for centuries when well-cared for, violin strings need to be replaced regularly. If you don’t change them as needed, the strings will sound duller, less resonant, and may even fray or snap causing potential physical injuries.

 

Read More

COVID-19 and Cleaning Your Brass Instruments

COVID-19 and Cleaning Your Brass Instruments

Why should you disinfect your brass instruments?

In general, to avoid spreading diseases and to keep ourselves and students from getting reinfected. It’s smart to take extra measures to ensure we’re keeping ourselves as safe as we can. With that in mind, as musicians and educators, keeping our musical instruments clean and disinfected needs to become second nature.

 

Read More

How to Protect You and Your String Instrument During Flu Season

How to Protect You and Your String Instrument During Flu Season

With the flu season upon us, and in particular, the spread of COVID-19, we thought it a good idea to pass along recommendations from various experts about how to protect yourself and your string instrument to minimize inadvertently spreading viruses and other germs.

 

Read More

How to Choose A Violin Case Humidifier

How to Choose A Violin Case Humidifier

Wood continuously interacts with the moisture in the air around it. If the air is too dry, it will suck moisture out of your violin. A violin that's not surrounded by air in the target range of 45 to 55% humidity can mar your instrument. If your violin is too dry, it may experience temporary changes, like poor sound. A worse case scenario occurs when constant changes in the relative humidity damage your instrument badly enough to need repair. Not good.

 

Read More

Tips for Carrying Your Bass Without Hurting Yourself

Tips for Carrying Your Bass Without Hurting Yourself

S tring musicians take great care with their posture and playing technique to prevent stress- or overuse injuries. Those who play the upright bass must take extra precautions before ever removing the instrument from the case due to its large, heavy, and cumbersome anatomy.

 

Read More

How to Choose a Violin Case

How to Choose a Violin Case

A violin case is a must – so let go of any idea that cases are optional. The fragility of string instruments, particularly violins and violas, requires an extra layer of protection whenever the instrument isn’t in use.

 

Read More

What is Considered a String Instrument?

What is Considered a String Instrument?

The string instrument family has the most significant number of "children" than any other group of instruments. Worldwide, there are more than 300 different instruments that are considered part of the string family. These range from the single-stringed diddly bow, which originated here in the United States and contributed to blues music, to the 88-stringed piano, which is considered both a string and a percussion instrument.

 

Read More

10 Top Modern Holiday Songs For String instruments

10 Top Modern Holiday Songs For String instruments

W hile holiday classics are "classic" for a reason, it can be mind numbing to play the same songs over and over, year after year. We understand your frustration.

Thus, one of our holiday gifts to you is this list of 10 modern holiday songs made just for string musicians. Yes, they're arrangements based on traditional carols, but at least they'll give you a break from the typical versions you've played for years.

 

Read More

2019 Update: Products That Help You Care for Your Instrument During the Winter

2019 Update: Products That Help You Care for Your Instrument During the Winter

Winter is one of the toughest seasons on your instrument. Moisture – and mostly a lack of it – can present moderate to large problems. Temperature and humidity fluctuations bounce between outdoor extremes, indoor climate control, and the "in-between" places like your car or on the bus. These extremes and constant changes can cause issues that damage the bridges, tuning pegs and strings. They also affect the wood body of the instrument, causing it to warp or crack.

 

Read More

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